Crib of Infant Christ

crib

Never seen anything like it. The Met has a Twitter feed where they post this kind of stuff:

Date: 15th century
Geography: Made in Brabant, South Netherlands
Culture: South Netherlandish
Medium: Wood, polychromy, lead, silver-gilt, painted parchment, silk embroidery with seed pearls, gold thread, translucent enamels
Dimensions: 13 15/16 x 11 3/8 x 7 1/4 in. (35.4 x 28.9 x 18.4 cm) Other (pillow): 4 1/4 x 6 3/4 x 1 3/4 in. (10.8 x 17.1 x 4.4 cm) Bedcover: 6 7/8 × 6 1/2 × 1/8 in. (17.4 × 16.5 × 0.3 cm) Other (Cavity under thre crib): 2 1/16 × 1 1/8 × 1/4 in. (5.2 × 2.8 × 0.7 cm)
Classification: Woodwork

Miniature cradles for the Christ Child were popular devotional objects in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries and were venerated, especially in convents, where they were often presented to women taking their vows. This splendid cradle comes from the Grand Béguinage of Louvain, Belgium, established for lay women in the twelfth century. It is decorated with carved representations of the Nativity and the Adoration of the Magi on either end. The biblical family tree of Christ is illustrated on the embroidered coverlet.

 

http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/the-collection-online/search/465966?utm_source=Twitter&utm_medium=tweet&utm_content=20160112&utm_campaign=collections

dd

About zjb

Zachary Braiterman is Professor of Religion in the Department of Religion at Syracuse University. His specialization is modern Jewish though and philosophical aesthetics. http://religion.syr.edu
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One Response to Crib of Infant Christ

  1. dmf says:

    must have been quite the stable, wonder what how the rooms at the inn where decorated?
    http://meaningoflife.tv/videos/33273

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